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Centre for Native Policy and Research

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70 Ways to Reduce the Cost of Developing and Operating Supportive Housing for Seniors

Publication type: 
Training / Education Manual
Author(s): 
Mancer, Kate; Holmes, Carol
Agency: 
BC Non-Profit Housing Association (BCNPHA)
Sponsor: 
Real Estate Foundation of BC; BC Housing; Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC)
Date: 
2004-10
Pages: 
117
Summary: 
This guide is designed to help interested individuals and groups develop and operate affordable housing for seniors. It is intended to assist groups ranging from non-profit organizations with no experience in seniors housing to operators of large assisted living facilities. The term "supportive housing" refers to housing situations ranging from completely independent seniors housing to licensed residential care (nursing homes). The guide focuses on housing that provides hospitality services (meals, laundry, housekeeping, social and recreational activities) or personal care services (help with bathing, dressing, eating) or both. Research into existing supportive housing projects suggests opportunities for streamlining costs and improving efficiency. This guide provides guidelines, comparisons and suggestions that will save money in the development, construction and operation of supportive housing projects for seniors. A total of 55 individuals and organizations were interviewed during the preparation of this report.
Keywords: 
BC Non-Profit Housing Association (BCNPHA); seniors; supportive housing; congregate housing; assisted living; retirement housing; independent living; hospitality services; personal care services

Models for Sustainable Partnerships Between Housing Providers and Community Agencies To Address Homelessness

Publication type: 
Research Paper / Project Report
Author(s): 
Kraus, Deborah; Eberle, Margaret; Jim Woodward and Associates Inc.
Agency: 
BC Non-Profit Housing Association (BCNPHA)
Sponsor: 
Government of Canada's National Homelessness Initiative
Date: 
2005-02-28
Pages: 
145
Summary: 
This report describes eight partnership initiatives that involve housing providers and service agencies working together to address homelessness. The housing providers are making units available to people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness and who face barriers accessing affordable housing. Local, provincial and federal governments also play a role through the provision of land, project coordination, and funding.
Keywords: 
B.C. Non-Profit Housing Association (BCNPHA); housing; homelessness; non-profit housing; mental illness; addictions; health issues

Beyond the four waves of colonization

Publication type: 
Research Paper / Project Report
Author(s): 
Thira, Darien
Pages: 
6
Summary: 
This paper explores the four waves of colonization; which Thira proposes are legal, administrative, ideological, and the oppressive Western 'healing.' Thira discusses the negative impacts on Aboriginal people as a result of these waves of colonization" and ends with a section on "Breaking the tide: Aboriginal Healing"
Keywords: 
colonization; Aboriginal; legislation; healing

Native Courtworker and Counselling Association of British Columbia: 2003 Annual Report

Publication type: 
Annual Report
Author(s): 
Native Courtworker and Counselling Association of British Columbia
Agency: 
Native Courtworker and Counselling Association of British Columbia
Sponsor: 
B.C. Ministry of Attorney General Community Programs Division and Security Division; Ministry of Chi
Date: 
2003
Pages: 
20
Summary: 
A 2003 annual report on the Lower mainland and what Aboriginal people have been up against. Statistics and newspaper articles are incorporated to give the reader a sense of what crimes are committed and who is committing them. Also added are community members opinions on why there has been a sharp rise in Aboriginal involvement in crime and the court system.
Keywords: 
Aboriginal; Native Courtworker Program; British Columbia; Annual Report; economic conditions; justice system; Regional reports; offenders; over-representation

Aboriginal Education in Winnipeg Inner City High Schools

Publication type: 
Research Paper / Project Report
Author(s): 
Silver, Jim; Mallet, Kathy; Greene, Janice; Simard, Freeman
Agency: 
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives; Winnipeg Inner-City Research Alliance
Sponsor: 
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
Date: 
2002-12
Pages: 
65
Summary: 
In this study the researchers investigate the educational circumstances of Aboriginal students in Winnipeg inner city high schools. The study is based on interviews with Aboriginal students, Aboriginal school leavers, adult members of the Aboriginal community, and teachers. Responses by Aboriginal people to the researchers questions about their experiences in schools reveal the existence of what the researchers have identified as a cultural/class/experiential divide between Aboriginal students and their families on the one hand, and the school system on the other. Aboriginal students experience the divide between themselves and the school system on a daily basis, and a good deal of what they experience in school is negative. Not surprisingly, many Aboriginal students resist and even reject this form of education. This is not the way in which this issue is generally understood. It is generally understood as a problem of Aboriginal students failing in school, of their having a 'dropout' rate double that of non-Aboriginal students. The evidence that the researchers have gathered suggests to us that Aboriginal people want the education that is needed to enable them to participate fully in Canadian society and in their own self-governance but they do not want to abandon what it is to be Aboriginal in order to do so.
Keywords: 
Aboriginal; students; education; Winnipeg; inner-city schools; inner-city high school; youth; school leaving; 'dropout' rates; curriculum; colonialism; racism; experiences; resistance; educational attainment

First Nations/Metis/Inuit Mobility Study: Final Report

Publication type: 
Research Paper / Project Report
Author(s): 
Distaslo, Jino; Sylvester, Gina; Jaccubucci, Christa; Mulligan, Susan; Sargent, Kurt
Agency: 
Institute of Urban Studies: University of Winnipeg; Assembley of Manitoba Chiefs; Manitoba Metis Fed
Sponsor: 
Western Economic Diversification Canada
Date: 
2004-03
Pages: 
155
Summary: 
The First Nations/Metis/Inuit Mobility study conducted interviews with persons recently moving to Winnipeg. The objective was to examine the mobility process from two perspectives: the initial move into the city and the reasons why, and the subsequent pattern of movement within the city once persons remained. The research also assessed the pattern of service use during this period to better understand the needs of persons as they adjusted to living in the city. The results point to a slow transition process, along with an increase in the number of respondents who were unable to find suitable housing. The findings suggest that support is needed at two critical junctures. First, and perhaps most important, is when people initially arrive in the city. It is absolutely critical there be assistance available to connect people in need to the services required, especially housing. The second critical point where help is most needed is during the first few months of living in the city, where increased residential instability was observed.
Keywords: 
Aboriginal; First Nations; Inuit; mobility; Winnipeg; urbanization; social services; housing; residential instability; residential mobility; affordable housing; inner city; housing suitability; quality of housing; movement; residence crowding; subsidized rent

Fast Facts: Aboriginal Education for Winnipeg's Future

Publication type: 
Brochure / Leaflet / Pamphlet / Information Sheet
Author(s): 
Silver, Jim; Millet, Kathy
Agency: 
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives-MB
Sponsor: 
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives - Manitoba
Date: 
2003-06-23
Pages: 
2
Summary: 
The 2001 Consensus reveals that Winnipeg has the largest urban Aboriginal population in Canada. It is expected that a decade from now, at lease one in five people reaching working age in Manitoba will be Aboriginal. Given this, Aboriginal education is central to Winnipeg's future and from what we know Aboriginal students are less likely than non-Aboriginal students to graduate from high school. This article investigates the educational circumstances of Aboriginal students in Winnipeg inner city high schools through interviews and held focus groups with more than 130 Aboriginal people- high school students, school-leavers, adults, and some teachers. The findings show that three things need to change; 1) more Aboriginal teachers 2) more Aboriginal content in the curriculum and 3) racism in the schools.
Keywords: 
education; 'dropout'; racism; curriculum; Aboriginal teachers; Winnipeg; Manitoba; Aboriginal; students; school; high school; school leavers

Fast Facts: To help one another: The story of Ma Mawi

Publication type: 
Brochure / Leaflet / Pamphlet / Information Sheet
Author(s): 
Silver, Jim
Agency: 
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives-MB
Sponsor: 
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives - Manitoba
Date: 
2004-06-25
Pages: 
2
Summary: 
The story of an Aboriginal organization, Ma Mawi, that at one point become a relatively big, bureaucratic organization which was proving to be unhelpful to the Aboriginal community, began remaining itself and then reconstructing itself on the basis of what its constituents said they wanted. Ma Mawi sought to re-connect with the urban Aboriginal community, and to work with the community to build on the existing strengths (e.g. culture) and to work to build the capacity of the community to solve its own problems instead of the organization trying to "fix" them.
Keywords: 
Aboriginal; community-based; culture; Aboriginal organizations; bureaucracy; urban; Winnipeg; Manitoba; inner city; social services

Building community support for the prevention of youth suicide and personal injury: Response to the youth bridging project survey

Publication type: 
Research Paper / Project Report
Author(s): 
Cochrane, Nancy; Ogen, Karen; Cochrane, Krysta; Caillier, Lisa
Agency: 
Centre for Native Policy and Research (CNPR)
Sponsor: 
Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research for the Aboriginal Health Research Network
Date: 
2006-01
Pages: 
25
Summary: 
Carrier Sekani Family Services (CSFS) has been building research capacity in their eleven communities in northern B.C. during the past decade. The Carrier Sekani First Nation peoples are situated northeast of Prince George, B.C. on a rural and remote reserve lands. The purpose of the Youth Bridging Survey Project was to address the issues that Aboriginal youth face in their communities, such as: lack of communication skills, self-awareness, home management, budgeting, low level of education, unemployment and training. The intention was to assist youth participants to become aware of their strengths and needs, and then address issues of career, education and training to aspire their future goals (CSFS, 2002).
Keywords: 
Aboriginal; Centre for Native Policy and Research; Carrier Sekani Family Services (CSFS); youth; prevention of youth suicide and personal injury; building community support; Youth Bridging Survey Project

An Urban Aboriginal Life: The 2005 Indicators Report on the Quality of Life of Aboriginal People in the Greater Vancouver Region

Publication type: 
Research Paper / Project Report
Author(s): 
Cardinal, Nathan; Emille
Agency: 
Centre for Native Policy and Research (CNPR); Adin Research and Planning
Sponsor: 
Greater Vancouver Urban Aboriginal Strategy; Western Economic Diversification; Canadian Centre for P
Date: 
2005-11
Pages: 
137
Summary: 
While the majority of Canadians enjoy one of the highest levels of quality of life in the world, the situation is radically different for the Aboriginal population. In order to document the social, economic, and environmental conditions of Aboriginal people living in the Greater Vancouver Regional District (GVRD), a series of indicators relevant to the Aboriginal community were developed and evaluated. While there is a significant trend in the migration of Aboriginal people to urban areas, with over 57% of all Aboriginal people now living in urban areas (Statistics Canada, 2001 Census), there is a paucity of information available regarding this segment of the Aboriginal population. This report attempts to counteract this gap in analysis by providing a comprehensive assessment of the quality of life of the Greater Vancouver's urban Aboriginal population. This report: documents the present social, economic, and environmental conditions of Aboriginal people living in the GVRD; acts as a benchmark for future studies; highlights gaps in data; and provides recommendations regarding future data gathering, research, and policy developments.
Keywords: 
Aboriginal; Greater Vancouver Regional District (GVRD); urbanization; quality of life; indicators; social; economic and environmental conditions; health conditions; culture and family; education; crime and safety; employment; income; entrepreneurship; youth; resources and land; air; rivers and oceans; homes; cultural participation; traditional languages; children in care; lone parents; childcare; infant mortality rate; life expectancy; diabetes; cancer; HIV/AIDS; high school graduation; post-secondary graduation; educational special needs; educational alternative programs; incarceration rates; rates of violent crime; Aboriginal workforce; management positions; poverty; social assistance; self-employed; unemployment rates; level of income; green space; protected land areas; salmon harvest (Fraser River); air quality; air emissions; water quality; salmon escapement; housing units requiring major repairs; low-income housing; homelessness
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